Prescriptions

Urgent Prescriptions

 

Due to an increasing number of requests for repeat prescriptions to be issued urgently, we have had to review how we handle these requests in order to provide safe and consistent service to all our patients. Requests for prescriptions outside the normal prescription protocol impacts significantly on both doctor and administration staff time.

If you ask for an urgent repeat prescription, you will need to give the reason for your request.

The majority of repeat prescriptions are non-urgent and will be processed through the normal prescription process.

Please make sure you request any medication before you run out: prescriptions take 3 working days to process. The practice can now electronically send most prescriptions direct to a pharmacy of your choice. Contact reception to nominate your pharmacy and each time you request a repeat script, your script will be electronically sent to your nominated pharmacy, ready for you to pick up.  You can also order your authorised repeat prescription on-line, any time day or night, if you register for our on-line service. Please note that Electronic Prescriptions still require 3 working days to be processed.

If you have seen a hospital clinician who has requested a medication to be prescribed by your GP this will be actioned through the normal prescription process; the majority of these requests are non-urgent. If you feel these are urgent please contact the hospital clinician who can provide the medication initially.

We will not issue urgent prescriptions for items that can be bought over the counter.

It is your responsibility to ensure you request any medication 5 days before you run out: prescriptions take 3 working days to process. The pharmacy then needs time to prepare your medication.

 

It will be down to the GP’s discretion whether this request is urgent.

How to order repeat prescriptions for yourself online

To order your repeat prescriptions online, you must be registered for online services with the practice.

 

Once registered for online services, you will automatically have access to new information added to your record.

You may also request access to the following services:

  • Viewing and requesting repeat prescriptions
  • Viewing and booking appointments
  • Viewing your detailed coded record

 

To register for online services please complete our Online Services Request Form and return it to the surgery in person. 

You will need to have your identity verified by a receptionist so please bring two forms of identification with you. One must be a photo ID and the other must be proof of address. If you can’t provide two forms of identification, please speak to a receptionist.

 

How to order repeat prescriptions for someone else online

To order prescriptions online for someone else, you must have been granted proxy access to online services by the practice.

 To apply for this, please visit reception or email us parkadmin@nhs.net

Repeat Prescriptions

Your doctor may issue you with a prescription for medication which you can take to any pharmacy or may be sent to any pharmacy electronically - you need to advise the surgery of your 'nominated pharmacy' (see below for more information).

If you have repeat medications, these will be listed on the form attached to your current prescription. There is a letter box for completed repeat prescription requests at the surgery or you can order on-line via the link at the top of this page (you will need to register for this service).

PLEASE NOTE - Online services can only be accessed from within the UK.

Collections

We do advise that you allow at least 5 full working days between submitting your request for more medication and collecting it due to us receiving very high volumes of prescription requests and queries every day. It's also worth checking if your prescription is ready before coming in.

Prescriptions requests that are made electronically and sent electronically to a nominated pharmacy will be processed quicker- due to the nature of the processes involved. 

Medication Reviews

Patients on repeat medication will be asked to see a doctor, nurse practitioner or practice nurse at least once a year to review these regular medications and notification should appear on your repeat slip.

Please ensure that you book an appropriate appointment to avoid unnecessary delays to further prescriptions.

Prescription Fees

Help with NHS costs

In England, around 90% of prescription items are dispensed free. This includes exemptions from charging for those on low incomes, such as:

  • those on specific benefits or through the NHS Low Income Scheme
  • those who are age exempt
  • those with certain medical conditions
  • More information is available at NHS Choices

NHS Charges

These charges apply in England only. In Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales prescriptions are free of charge.

  • Prescription (per item): £9.35
  • 12-month prepayment certificate (PPC): £108.10
  • 3-month PPC: £30.25

If you will have to pay for four or more prescription items in three months or more than 14 items in 12 months, you may find it cheaper to buy a PPC.

  • Telephone advice and order line 0845 850 0030
  • General Public - Buy or Renew a PPC On-line

There is further information about prescription exemptions and fees on the NHS website.

Medicine Sick Day Rules

When you should stop taking your medication?

If you are unwell with any of the following:

  • Vomiting or diarrhoea (unless only minor)
  • Fevers, sweats shaking

Then STOP taking the medicines listed here. 

  • ACE Inhibitors: Medicine names ending in 'pril' e.g. lisinopril, perindopril, ramipril
  • ARBs: Medicine names ending in 'sartan' e.g. losartan, candesartan, valsartan
  • NSAIDs: Anti-inflammatory pain killers e.g. ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen
  • Diuretics: Sometimes called 'water pills' egg furosemide, spironolactone, indapamide, bendroflumethiazide
  • Metformin: A medicine for diabetes

Restart when you are well (after 24-48 hours of eating and drinking normally). If you are in any doubt, please contact us or your pharmacist.